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Mark J. Palmiere Attorney at Law

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Children with Disabilities
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Social Security Disability
Social Security Disability
Social Security Eligibility
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Applying for Social Security
Denial of Benefits
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Read our informative blogs on social security disability.

Children with Disabilities

Rochester Social Security Disability Attorney

Caring for a child who has a disability can pose physical, mental, and financial challenges. To help ease some of these burdens, Social Security created special programs for children who have certain types of disabilities. Supplemental Security Income payments are for children younger than the age of 18 who have disabilities, while Social Security Disability Insurance benefits are for adults who became disabled in childhood.

If you would like to learn more about SSI or SSDI benefits, please contact my Rochester Social Security disability attorney at Mark J. Palmiere, Attorneys at Law. I, Mark J. Palmiere, have more than 20 years of Social Security experience and can help both children and adults receive Social Security disability benefits. I can help people in and around Rochester, New York, as well as people who live throughout Monroe County with various types of Social Security disability benefit needs. To learn if I can help you and your child, please contact my office.

Supplemental Security Income Payments

Supplemental Security Income can make monthly payments to people who have a low income and limited resources who are 65 years of age or older, as well as to individuals who are blind or disabled. If an individual has a child who is younger than 18 years old, they may qualify for Supplemental Security Income if they meet Social Security's definition of disability for children.

A child with a disability can also be eligible for SSI if their income and resources are within the eligibility limits. SSI amounts differ in each state due to the fact that some states contribute to the SSI payment. Social Security bases a child's eligibility to receive SSI from their income and resources. They also consider the income and resources of family members who live with the disabled child.

A child can also apply for SSI if they are away at school but return home from time to time and are still under a parent's ruling. If a child's income and resources, or the child's family's income and resources are over a certain amount, Social Security will deny them from receiving SSI payments. A child who is in a medical facility where health insurance pays for their care can only receive an SSI payment of no more than $30 a month.

Is my child qualified to receive SSI?

In order for a child to be eligible for SSI, they must not be working and earning more than $1,040 a month (this amount changes every year). If they are working and earning that much money, they will not qualify for SSI.

A child must also have a physical disability, mental disability, or both that result in "marked and severe functional limitations." This means that the condition a child has must severely limit their daily activities. The condition must also be disabling or expected to be disabling for at least 12 months, or must be expected to result in the child's death.

If a child's condition meets these parameters, Social Security may find them disabled and may grant them SSI. When a parent or caregiver wishes to apply for disability benefits, they must provide detailed information regarding their child's medical condition and how it affects their daily life. A child's doctors, therapists, teachers, and other professionals may also be asked to send information regarding the child's condition.

Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits

Adults who have a disability that began before they reached 22 years of age may be eligible to receive Social Security Disability Insurance, or SSDI. This is considered a "child's" benefit because it is paid on a parent's Social Security earnings record.

If a disabled adult wishes to receive SSDI, one of their parents must be receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits or must have died and have worked for a certain period of time under Social Security. Benefits are also available to adults who received dependents benefits on a parent's Social Security earnings record before they turned 18. SSDI benefits remain active as long as the adult remains disabled, and they do not have to have worked to receive said benefits.

Contact a Rochester Social Security Disability Lawyer

If you wish to learn more about SSI or SSDI benefits for your child, please contact me. I can help parents determine if their child is eligible to receive such benefits, as well as help them apply for SSI or SSDI benefits. You and your child have everything to gain and nothing to lose by contacting my firm.


Please call my office to schedule an appointment with me to learn how I can help your child receive SSI or SSDI benefits.


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